Author Topic: how to de-PIN a DL plug-socket  (Read 3691 times)

Matt Sartori

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how to de-PIN a DL plug-socket
« on: September 03, 2012, 09:57:00 AM »
Hello Everybody,
I am wondering how you guys recycle the DLs and how you de-pin them..
I use the old school paper clip method..
is there anything better and quicker?

Mattia.

jimlfixit

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DL de-pinning techiques
« Reply #1 on: September 03, 2012, 02:01:02 PM »
I guess you may have known I would reply to this!

I have a DL crimp removal tool which is a fudge load of money and not really worthwhile in my view as they can easily break. For the last decade or so, I have used the trusty old paper clip but with a few different techniques to help it do its job. First of all, the task of de-pinning a DL can be made harder if the original crimping wasn't done properly although you are now stuck with that as it is too late to sort out now.

Sometimes the wrong size crimper position on the crimping tool could be used which may result in the back of the crimp, the bit gripping the wire insulation, bending at an angle. This makes it more liable to stick in the DL hole causing more effort and possible damage to the connector when you try and remove it. Also, the bigger the wire size used, the harder it is to remove.

Try different diameters of paperclip to see what suits. Also, and this could be important, use a needle file to file the end to shape it like a wedge. Imagine a normal paperclip being pushed into a DL hole. It has a blunt end and it comes into contact with the sprung DL clip holding the crimp into place. The paperclip needs to gradually push against this and make it press back close to the body of the crimp so you can extract it. In the rest of this message, I'll refer to this DL crimp bit of metal as RT as the ITT spec sheet describes this as a Retention Lance.

Occasionally, using a normal paperclip fails and you end up with the RT being bent back making it hard to remove without damaging the internal hole. If this happens and you manage to get the crimp out, you may not be able to secure another crimp in there. Using a wedge shaped paperclip the right way round, it gradually comes into contact with the RT (rather than one big blunt end all at once) and eases the RT back against the main body with more chance of success. Make sure you know which way the DL crimp RT is in the connector (they are mirror imaged either side of the connector) so that the paperclip wedge matches it.

This is difficult to write down and I'll try and attach a drawing somehow after I post this.

Also, the art of removing pins is not just down to inserting a paper clip and pushing. I find it is best to fix the connector into a vice so you can see both the back and front. Then, with your paperclip inserted and lightly in contact with the RT inside, use a jewellers screwdriver to apply pressure to the rear of the crimp, almost trying to push it more into the connector shell.

The DL crimp RT holds the crimp in place by being held against a piece of retaining shell material behind it. If you push the crimp forward a bit with the screwdriver, it frees the RT a bit. Hold the screwdriver in position and then use the paperclip against the RT. When it is fully inserted, you can then remove the pin. Sometimes, I have held the screwdriver in my mouth whilst applying pressure, using my hands to use the paperclip and gradually wiggle and pull the wire with crimp attached out from the rear.

DL sockets are easier to de-pin but most people need to reuse the expensive plug instead. Try using different filed paperclips and use a small screwdriver to help push and pull the crimp along with the paperclip. Don't force anything as you may end up with a damaged connector so, take your time and I hope this helps. If you are careful and the pin has been properly crimped to begin with you should end up with reusable connectors.

Finally, when you have fully depinned a connector, look carefully at it from the front so you can see the internal holes. Check that the "retention lance" retaining material is still intact and not destroyed by your efforts. I hope this helps, Jim Lassen (www.profcon.co.uk).

Now I need to find out how to attach a drawing on here. Draw, scan, pdf it (or take an image?), put it on Photobucket and paste it across to the site??? I don't know yet. If or when I manage to post a picture, I'll add text in red so you can see the amendment.

jplebre

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Re: how to de-PIN a DL plug-socket
« Reply #2 on: September 08, 2012, 11:02:15 PM »
We are changing the monitoring system (Thanks mata_haze for your relay box). de-pining the DL was !£%)*!U£^%

I got a lot of awkward looks because I was swearing like a mother whilst branding a paperclip at the skies.
Done now. But I forgot to add the third pair. So will have to go back in at some point!

ARGHHH

jimlfixit

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Re: how to de-PIN a DL plug-socket
« Reply #3 on: February 17, 2013, 12:32:33 AM »
I am very embarrassed to admit that, after wiring 100's of DL plugs during the last 30 years or so, I wired one upside down today. I got half way through a 24 pair and then realised that the ruddy connector (for want of a better word!) was the wrong way round.

Totally my fault of course as I didn't look at it properly. My point is, beware and look at it carefully to being with. I am about to post some info regarding wiring DL plugs shortly so I hope I have finally learned my lesson on this ...?

The good news is that it took 5 minutes with a proper DL removal tool to de-pin the connector and I attach a picture showing it in action. I started off with a normal paper clip but it was not as good although ones which are filed at the end in a wedge shape are okay (I didn't have one nearby). More on that later.

Hope this helps and saves you people from doing the same thing. Preparation is so important. Regards from Jim Lassen (www.profcon.co.uk).
« Last Edit: February 17, 2013, 12:44:19 AM by jimlfixit »

Matt Sartori

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Re: how to de-PIN a DL plug-socket
« Reply #4 on: February 18, 2013, 09:01:49 AM »
Hi Jim,
where would I get a de-pin tool from ?
how much do you reckon it cost?

Mattia.

jimlfixit

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ITT DL removal tool
« Reply #5 on: February 18, 2013, 01:52:44 PM »
The part number for the ITT DL removal tool is CET DL10. Farnell and RS have them for about £23 which is a lot of money. I attach a picture showing my older worn out version and I'll add a picture of a modified paperclip at some point. Basically, use a needle file and make the end a wedge shape.

marcmozart

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Re: how to de-PIN a DL plug-socket
« Reply #6 on: February 18, 2013, 03:24:28 PM »
Thanks Jim,
this comes just in time for me - I have a box of DLs I need to de-PIN for the final install of my console!

E-mailing you now as I need DL Pins!
1992 SSL 4048 G-Series
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marcmozart

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DL removal report
« Reply #7 on: February 26, 2013, 09:04:49 PM »
As the next step of my console installation I needed to free the DL plugs that came with my 4048G from the pins. Here's how I got the job done…

I ordered the ITT DL removal tool (CET DL10) similar to the pic above in Jim's post.

The cheapest price in Germany was with de.rs-online.de - shocking 50 Euros incl. shipping!!  :-[

http://de.rs-online.com/web/p/ausziehwerkzeuge/0406723/

First of all, the DL plug has to be set in "unlock". Next I removed the "hood" of the DL connector with 4 crews and also the big screw holding the lock, so you can remove the lock and the hood to get to the backside of the connector. Not complicated AT ALL.

For me, the removal tool worked really well on about 70% of the pins. I had a total of 14 DL plugs to unpin. You basically insert the tool from the frontside of the connector into the space that every pin leaves. If all goes well, you hear a clicking noise and remove the pin by pulling at the remaining cable.

If it doesn't go well, nothing happens. Or you pull the cable, but the pin is still stuck inside. In these cases, you need to wiggle the pin back and forth with the inserted tool from one side, and a tiny screwdriver from the other side. Do that without force, but rather playful. If at any point you hear the clicking noise again, try pulling the cable (sometimes with force!!!). It's tough to explain (Jim did a good job explaining it in his post above), but you get a feel for it after a while. Hope you get the idea!

After I de-pinned about 10 DL plugs, my DL removal tool broke and became useless. Luckily, until I buy 80 hardware compressors, I'll be totally fine with the 10 DLs I have now, and I'll see what RS says about my warranty request for the tool… (Update: got a refund for the broken DL removal tool from RS)

Next up - connecting my AD / DA convertor cables with DL plugs… stay tuned!  8)
« Last Edit: March 16, 2013, 10:43:55 PM by marcmozart »
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jimlfixit

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Marcs broken tool !
« Reply #8 on: February 27, 2013, 06:39:47 PM »
Hi Marc

I almost feel guilty now suggesting you buy a DL removal tool especially as it costs 50 Euros (about £43 at the current E/£ exchange rate). I could have bought one here and sent it to you with the 300 DL crimps you require ... damm, I thought that it would have been cheaper or the same price in Germany. Years ago when I last saw the price, it was £13. Now it is £23 and in Germany, £43. What a rip off for a piece of metal and a handle. Maybe the wedge shaped paper clip is okay after all.

The DL tool I showed in my picture has been around for over 20 years and I think I have only broken one since 1987.

Your point about using a screwdriver was good and I use this method as well. Don't just push the DL removal tool in and expect the crimp to come out. Sometimes you need to push the crimp back towards the front with a small jewellers screwdriver at the same time as the removal tool is inserted at the front to remove the pin. It is a push pull effect but do it gently as Marc states.

Of course it depends a bit on how the wire was crimped to begin with and if the crimp was bent as a result. I can't really put this into words so it almost needs a uTube video to explain.

Marc, I will be interested to know about your AD/DA convertors meets DL plug ideas. Perhaps send me some thoughts, ideas or pictures in advance and I can advise if needed.

Again, I hope this is helpful. Hopefully, with all the explanations on this thread, you DL crimp removal people out there can gain some knowledge and get the job done.

If there is a demand for the DL removal tools, I can contact several of my DL suppliers and see how cheaply they can be supplied for. Let me know if you are interested.

Regards from Jim Lassen

michaeldtech

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Re: how to de-PIN a DL plug-socket
« Reply #9 on: March 07, 2013, 01:21:03 AM »
I use a small jewelers screwdriver, the style with the hardened steel tip and the chrome handle, with the tip partially filed-down.
A paper clip works great, but it has to be the small clip from about 10 years ago (in the states).  Paper clips are smaller now, maybe 24 ga instead of 20 ga, and it makes a huge difference.  A box of clips today will not work well at all.  I keep a stash of older clips.

If a pin does not go the first time, push from behind, insert the de-pinning tool/clip, and then push the pin out with a small screwdriver or blunt hex.  As mentioned they can be bent from the original crimper, or older 20 ga crimps that are larger.
Mike